I. stop Animal crulety

Every year in the UK we eat 

  • 9.8 million pigs,

  • nearly 15 million sheep,

  • 18 million turkeys,

  • 14 million ducks,

  • over 945 million chickens 

  • and 2.6 million cattle.

 

Add the 4.5 billion fish and 2.6 billion shellfish to that and we reach a total of

over 8 billion animals killed in the UK each year.

 

This equates to around 22 million animals slaughtered every day; 919,000 an hour; 15,000 per minute and 255 every second.

 

Between 2009 to 2014, lobby group Animal Aid secreltyfilmed inside 10 abbertoirs in the UK, 9 of which were commiting horrific, law-breaking slaughter practices. The video is deeply shocking, but true. 

II. Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

The lack of clarity on the exact carbon emissions from livestock epitomises the uniquely far-reaching and diverse effect of the issue, and its destructive impacts on so many different elements of nature.

 

The UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) estimates that over 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions come from keeping livestock. Films like Cowspiracy convincingly argue the amount to be 51% whilst WWF estimate it is around 30%.

 

When you look beyond the digestive methane emissions from cows themselves, and begin to take into account industry and transportation, deforestation, land use, growing crops for food, manure, water pollution, slash and burn clearing techniques, forest fires, peat land burning and all the other terrible spin offs that come from keeping livestock - the effect is unfathomable.

 

While reducing waste, recycling, cycling to work is a great way to cut down on emissions, nothing compares to the impact that can be made with a vegan diet.

 

 

IV. health impacts

V. Save & protect Water

While skipping showers is one way to conserve water, the very best way is by going vegan. Many people in the world exist on 10 litres of water or less a day - approximately the almost one toilet flush.

 

Estimates suggest up to 30% of water is used on livestock farming to make meat, and in addition farmed animals produce 130 times more excrement than the human population, so the world's 1.4 billion cows cause further pollution to these precious waterways from farm run off. 

 

Carnivorous diets cost around 18,200 litres of water a day to produce, compared with 5,450 litres for a vegetarian and only 1,350 litres for a vegan.

 

One person can save as much as 162, 486 litres of water a year by giving up meat, enough for 450 people.

We have more than enough food and resources to feed eveyone no the planet, yet there are over 820 million malnourished people living in developing countries. The need for land to raise animals is causing massive amounts of deforestation and the mass displacement of indigenous people around the planet.

 

Plus, climate chage is being exasperated by our voracious need for meat. Droughts, rising water levels, the planting and felling of forests and natural disasters all threaten these vulnerable communities.

 

Of the 443,000 people killed and 2.5 billion affected by weather-related incidents in the last 10 years, more than 98 per cent of them came from developing countries. Refugees are created by wars, and wars are often motivated by resource shortage, both of these things will be exasperated by our continuing to turn a blind eye to the fact that simply changing our diets could change the world. 

The spin off effects of raising livestock are almost unfathomable.  From methane in digestion, to deforestation, the impact of 1.4 billion cows, 19 billion chickens and 1 billion of each cows and sheep is seriously significant. 

 

  • 51% of global greenhouses gases are associated to farmed livestock

 

  • 30% of land is now used for housing commercial farm animals

 

  • 29% of fresh water is drained to water livestock

 

  • More antibiotics are used on farm animals than humans globally

 

  • Human population increases by 1.2% per year.

 

  • Comparatively, livestock is increasing by staggering 2.4% per year

 

 

Animal agriculture is one of the most disastrously destructive industries in the world. Because of the complicated nature of calculating the carbon emissions from animals, production, land use, transportation and packaging etc. estimates of the percentage of carbon emissions from livestock farming vary from 18% - 50%. Despite the disagreements, this shows it is one of the biggest problems the world faces.

 

As populations continue to grow, huge, emerging markets get richer and able to afford more meat whilst earning large sums to produce it. We are not slowing down our consumption of meat, despite the encroaching chaos that will be caused by resources dwindling, atmospheres polluting and climates changing. 

Livestock

Animal crulety

Every year in the UK we eat 

  • 9.8 million pigs,

  • nearly 15 million sheep,

  • 18 million turkeys,

  • 14 million ducks,

  • over 945 million chickens 

  • and 2.6 million cattle.

 

Add the 4.5 billion fish and 2.6 billion shellfish to that and we reach a total of

over 8 billion animals killed in the UK each year.

 

This equates to around 22 million animals slaughtered every day; 919,000 an hour; 15,000 per minute and 255 every second.

 

Between 2009 to 2014, lobby group Animal Aid secreltyfilmed inside 10 abbertoirs in the UK, 9 of which were commiting horrific, law-breaking slaughter practices. The video is deeply shocking, but true. 

carbon emissions

The lack of clarity on the exact carbon emissions from livestock epitomises the uniquely far-reaching and diverse effect of the issue, and its destructive impacts on so many different elements of nature.

 

The UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) estimates that over 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions come from keeping livestock. Films like Cowspiracy convincingly argue the amount to be 51% whilst WWF estimate it is around 30%.

 

When you look beyond the digestive methane emissions from cows themselves, and begin to take into account industry and transportation, deforestation, land use, growing crops for food, manure, water pollution, slash and burn clearing techniques, forest fires, peat land burning and all the other terrible spin offs that come from keeping livestock - the effect is unfathomable.

 

While reducing waste, recycling, cycling to work is a great way to cut down on emissions, nothing compares to the impact that can be made with a veggie or vegan diet.

 

 

land use

Seven football fields’ worth of land is bulldozed every minute to create more room for farmed animals and the crops that feed them. In the Amazon alone, over 20% of forests have been felled since 1970.

 

Raising animals for food creates the largest demand for space that humans have ever forced upon the Earth. Not only do animals need somewhere to live and graze, they also need a phenomenal amount of land on which to grow feed crops.  

 

To accommodate this huge market, developing countries mostly are haphazardly slashing through the amazon, burning away vegetation, creating plumes of ruinous greenhouse gases for 

homogenised crops to feed cattle. 

Loosing these precious forests are like removing the planet's lungs, as these carbon sinks actually drink the damaging carbon from our atmosphere. So on top of creating more space for more cows with more methane, we are creating the inevitability of less sequestration, or removal, of carbon too.

of the Earth’s

      surface is 

           used for 

              livestock

1.5 acres can produce 170 kg of meat.

1.5 acres can alternatively produce 16,700 kg of plant based foods 

We have more than enough food and resources to feed everyone on the planet, yet there are over 820 million malnourished people living in developing countries. The need for land to raise animals is causing massive amounts of deforestation and the mass displacement of indigenous people around the planet.

 

Plus, climate chage is being exasperated by our voracious need for meat. Droughts, rising water levels, the planting and felling of forests and natural disasters all threaten these vulnerable communities.

Of the 443,000 people killed and 2.5 billion affected by weather-related incidents in the last 10 years, more than 98 per cent of them came from developing countries. Refugees are created by wars, and wars are often motivated by resource shortage, both of these things will be exasperated by our continuing to turn a blind eye to the fact that simply changing our diets could change the world. 

water

Estimates suggest up to 30% of water is used on livestock farming to make meat, and in addition farmed animals produce 130 times more excrement than the human population, so the world's 1.4 billion cows cause further pollution to these precious waterways from farm run off. 

 

Carnivorous diets cost around 18,200 litres of water a day to produce, compared with 5,450 litres for a vegetarian and only 1,350 litres for a vegan.

 

One person can save as much as 162, 486 litres of water a year by giving up meat, enough for 450 people.

human rights

 
 
 
 
 

Seven football fields’ worth of land is bulldozed every minute to create more room for farmed animals and the crops that feed them.

 

Raising animals for food creates the largest demand for space that humans have ever forced upon the Earth. Not only do animals need somewhere to live and graze, they also need a phenomenal amount of land on which to grow feed crops.  

 

To accommodate this huge market, developing countries mostly are haphazardly slashing through the amazon, burning away vegetation, creating plumes of ruinous greenhouse gases for 

homogenised crops to feed cattle. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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